Jun 18, 2020 A drain is a soft silicone tube implanted in the body and attached to a suction device that draws out excess fluids.

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The rubber tube carries the fluid outside your body. A surgical drain is a tube that facilitates the removal of blood, pus or other fluids, preventing them from accumulating within a wound.

Surgical Drains.

3,16 Chest radiographs are done periodically to determine whether the lung has reexpanded.

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This may help ease inflammation and encourage drainage.

A chest tube drains fluids that gather around the heart or between the lungs and chest wall. . .

This is called a Jackson-Pratt (JP) drain. The rational for when to remove a drain has not been scientifically determined.

The number of drains depends on the extent and type of surgery.

A drain may be superficial to the skin or deep in an organ, duct, or a cavity such as a hematoma.

e. Most recommend drains be removed when there is less than 25 to 30 cc total coming from a drain in 24 hours.

A surgical drain allows the fluid to flow out. Type of drain, location, and how the drain is secured should be known before drain removal.

If the fluid were to stay in the surgical site, it could press on surrounding structures, become infected, and cause other issues.

. . Classification of drains.

. A surgical drain allows the fluid to flow out. Two common surgical drains are chest tubes and bulb-type drains. . For breast. .

You may use an alcohol pad or apply lotion around the tubing to make it easier to slide your fingers down the tubing.

. The rubber tube carries the fluid outside your body.

A drain may be superficial to the skin or deep in the tissue, duct, or cavity.

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The timing for drain removal depends on both the initial indication for drain insertion and the patient response to therapy.

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If you feel resistance, stop and notify your surgeon.